My answer to the title question: Both have statues created by women artists in Boston: Poe by Steff Rocknak and Russell by Ann Hirsch. The dedicated, thorough approach of each artist to her subject links both stories of how their artworks came to be.

Here are two more art installations to get to know before they go! Both are projects of Now+There, related to their 2018 theme: Common Home. Both deal with issues of time, change, and public engagement. Yet they are different in scope, scale, and sensory experience.  I plan to revisit and reflect but must now give you valuable links about them without further delay.

Day by day, this space generates staged and spontaneous creative activity. I’m posting now with basic information (see Key Resources below) so that anyone who lives near enough, as I do, can truly be there while it’s still up in September. Photos from events I’ve been to might hint at how they were.

This post identifies what you need to find and/or find out about the five distinct but related fog sculptures now in Boston until October 31, 2018. My photos from visits to three of those sculptures remind me of how much can change from moment to moment and how far my images are from revealing the moving drama of the art. 

For many years I had cast admiring glances at stretches of the Mystic River Mural while driving past the intriguing composite scenes. Always on the way to somewhere else, I never stopped or searched enough till recently to learn that the mural has been growing for more than twenty years!

Walking to my nearby Porter Square and a bit beyond in Cambridge,  I visited murals that show elements of history in ways that suit this artform. You can learn and sense a lot about earlier centuries in Porter Square by walking the block that contains three related murals.  You can take in the impact and origins of a significant statesman’s life by standing in the presence of the Tip O’Neill mural in North Cambridge.

“Carving Out Fresh Options,” Diptych Painting by Shara Hughes Leads Up to a Monumental Mural on the Rose Kennedy Greenway
 
 
The mural was scaled up about twelve times from the original painting, but also cropped and shaped to fit the curving, choppy features of the Greenway Wall (one side of the air intake structure building).

The diptych (two-part) oil painting will be on view at deCordova in the museum through May 2019, while the mural is up on the Greenway Wall in Dewey Square Park, Boston.