In October I had read about the Greenway mural in progress on the Lincoln Street Triangle. Fortunately, I got there while the artist Mia Carollo Cross and her father were about to finish up the month-long project in the last hour of good daylight!  I spoke with Mia briefly about my interest in the process of creating murals and then began to photograph her, the materials, tools, and art.

If trees along the Minuteman Bikeway could talk, what would they say about the two most recent Arlington Public Art installations? I think they would say thank you for the respectful attention they’ve been given by artists Adria Arch (“Ripple”) and  Frank Vasello (“Current”). As a person passing along the Bikeway, I truly thank both artists for engaging me with the enduring structures and distinct qualities among trees. At the same time, I relish the marvelous patterns created by human hands and minds. I want to look longer, return often, and urge others to visit these artworks too.

Cambridge Common seemed to me a public space of few surprises until a few months ago. Then suddenly it became a place to spark inspiring statements by holding hands, to select story performances from a food truck, to share the seat of a gigantic chair, and to join an eyes-closed tour led by a blind artist. Those were just some of the experiences offered through Common Exchange*, with ongoing installations and scheduled events from May through September 2017.

Enlightened and excited by both artists’  presentations on September 26, I ‘m  posting quickly now, just in case you can plan to go before their temporary exhibits vanish October 7 (Reigelman) and October 8 (James). Later on, I hope to share our perspectives in the interactive spirit of these engaging forms of art outdoors.

This post shares my impressions from the Thirteenth Annual Honor Program at the Garden of Peace: a Memorial to Victims of Homicide. It follows from a July post with background about the Garden and the two women artists, Judy Kensley McKie and Catherine Melina.

As new murals emerged in Boston this summer,  I tried to track two through different stages of development. Both reminded me that mural artists must envision on a grand scale while also dealing with daily details and constant complexities. Many minds, hands, and hearts helped both murals come into being. One source common to both was the force of the non-profit organization Now and There headed by Kate Gilbert featuring the Year of the Woman in public art. I have referenced and quoted from their wonderful website at several points in this post. 

Of the seven Massachusetts State House statues listed on the Public Art Walk, three are by women, each from a different generation. This prompts me to present them in time order, with basic facts, key links, and selected quotes.