As new murals emerged in Boston this summer,  I tried to track two through different stages of development. Both reminded me that mural artists must envision on a grand scale while also dealing with daily details and constant complexities. Many minds, hands, and hearts helped both murals come into being. One source common to both was the force of the non-profit organization Now and There headed by Kate Gilbert featuring the Year of the Woman in public art. I have referenced and quoted from their wonderful website at several points in this post. 

Of the seven Massachusetts State House statues listed on the Public Art Walk, three are by women, each from a different generation. This prompts me to present them in time order, with basic facts, key links, and selected quotes.

A blog called Art Outdoors cries out for posts about Storm King Art Center, a grand-scale sculpture park. Finally, I feel ready to respond, with a few starting notes, photos, and links. 

Originally posted on Cambridge Outdoors:
Image © Bimal Nepal, BimalPhoto.com. Several animal celebrities of the Cambridge Wildlife Puppetry Project (CWPP), whose activities are supported by the Cambridge Arts Council and the Massachusetts Cultural Council this year, visited picnicking families and others at Magazine Beach Park Friday for a Walk/Ride Day celebration. Stay tuned for the CWPP’s four-day…

Originally posted on Cambridge Outdoors:
The Isabella Tiger Moth is one of many you can see in Cambridge. It’s National Moth Week. Go out and find yourself a moth this week! Photo By Steve Jurvetson from Menlo Park, USA – A Moth is Born, CC BY 2.0.

Planned by landscape architect Catherine Melina and sculptor Judy Kensley McKie, this memorial to victims of homicide provides a pathway and suggests a journey.

In connection with the exhibition Expanding Abstraction at the deCordova Museum (April 7—September 17, 2017) the museum’s Process Gallery highlights the art of Ursula von Rydingsvard and other women artists with work in deCordova Sculpture Park. I’m posting now to extend the connection to a recent monumental sculpture by Ursula von Rydingsvard at MIT.