My first post about women artists represented on Public Art Walk Boston included art by both Anne Whitney and Theo Alice Ruggles Kitson on Commonwealth Avenue Mall. That was in March 2017. Now almost a year later, I will wrap up the promised project with their additional art. 

I had wavered about including Denise Kupferschmidt on my list of women artists represented on Public Art Walk Boston after I read that “a group of assistants executed this piece, guided by precise written instructions and diagrams from LeWitt.” Yet I came to understand that each artist on the team to carry out a wall drawing could contribute uniquely within LeWitt’s guidelines. More important, as I began to learn about Denise Kupferschmidt’s art, I truly wanted to share what she has shown!

To keep up with the timing of my goal to post about women artists represented on Public Art Walk Boston, I’ll focus on the known facts now. This could lead to future posts with more fluent followup.

Lilli Ann Killen Rosenberg (1924–2011) initiated memorably collaborative community art projects wherever she went throughout her working life. From the Henry Street Settlement in New York City to numerous sites in the Boston area and then others in southern Oregon, she engaged children and adults in creating responsive public art. This post offers images from Boston sites I have visited and quotes or links that motivate me to visit many more.   

Making my way through the list of twenty-two women artists represented on Boston Public Art Walk, I’ve grown more aware of how pivotal Nancy Schön has been to my own interest in public art. …Through the years I’ve watched or joined with adults and children of all ages interacting happily with distinctive animal characters from Make Way for Ducklings written and illustrated by Robert McCloskey, published 1941.

Deborah Butterfield is one of the twenty-two women artists represented on Public Art Walk Boston. Her sculpture “Henry and Paint” is situated outside Copley Place. Visiting Henry and Paint through successive seasons of 2017, I saw them as distinct individuals bonded by their survival of changed surroundings.

Temporary Art Takes in the Expected Effects of Time and Weather After posting about two temporary art installations, “Ripple” and “Current,” in early autumn, I planned to revisit them at least once each month to see how they would survive seasonal changes. I did not know then how compelling both would prove to be, far beyond just curiosity. […]