Salute to Women Sculptors along Commonwealth Avenue Mall

The route of the Women’s March in January along Commonwealth Avenue in Boston revived my interest in the women’s art that’s always waiting there. Then Women’s History Month this March got me strolling through the snow to document and honor what I’ve learned: Women sculptors created five of the nine artworks along the mall. Here are their monuments in the sequence you would see them on a walk from the Boston Public Garden to Charlesgate East.

Click on blue text for links to information about statues and artists. Click on photos for full frames and captions with quotes from Public Art Boston.

1. Memorial for Patrick Andrew Collins (1844-1905) was created by Theo Alice Kitson and her husband Henry Kitson in 1908.

Theo Alice Ruggles Kitson (1871 – 1932) from Wikipedia

2. Statue of Samuel Eliot Morison maritime historian created by Penelope Jencks was dedicated in 1982.

3. Boston Women’s Memorial created by Meredith Bergmann was dedicated in 2003.

For context and background, watch video Boston Women’s Memorial – A Video for Primary Source and NEA.

 4. Statue of Domingo F. Sarmiento created by Ivette Compagnion was dedicated in 1973.

“Known as the father of public education in his homeland, Argentina, Domingo Sarmiento (1811-1888) was also that country’s president. Sarmiento was a disciple of American educator Horace Mann and his wife Mary. In the 1860s, while serving as Minister in the Argentina Embassy, he initiated a number of educational projects between North and South America.” …from Boston Immigrant Trail/ Back Bay

5. Monument to Norse explorer Leif Eriksson created by Anne Whitney, dedicated 1887.

No need to go in the snow, but good to go in better weather. Use Boston Art Commission interactive map for Back Bay. 

 

 

 

 

5 comments

  1. Sharon McBride · · Reply

    So great to discover these female artists! I had no idea that there’s a women’s memorial on Commonwealth. Very cool! Interesting to learn about both the artists and their subjects. Thanks Deb, for bringing these women and a their statues to my attention.

  2. Thank you, Sharon, for your motivating words! As I learned from the presenter in the video about the Boston Women’s Memorial, there were only two statues of historical women (rather than symbolic like Liberty or Victory) in all of Boston, before the Wheatley/Stone/Adams memorial came into being in 2003.

  3. […] this from the Friends of the Public Garden post during Women’s History Month, when I researched women sculptors on Commonwealth Avenue Mall. The sculptures in these four fountains are smaller scale than the two by men. All four are bronze […]

  4. I love the Women’s Memorial–I used to walk over to look at it every so often when I worked in that neighborhood. But now I find myself thinking–one memorial for all the women who have had such an influence in Boston and the rest of the country?

  5. Hey, Great images. I am looking forward to see more of your work.

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