Category art and science study

Mystic River Mural Panels from Last Summer Make Powerful Connections

Photos, quotes, and links related to the Mystic River Mural Project focus on the most recent additions, affirming the project’s persistent powers.

Randal Thurston’s Birds and Butterflies Guide Our Ways through Yerxa Road Underpass in Cambridge

Maybe best to show some of what I have seen lately along this pertinent passageway without trying to explain why I didn’t post earlier. I hope the links and quotes will give you ways to appreciate the efforts and effects of this public art project completed in 2006.

Spiral Inspired Art for Quincy Square, a Collaboration of David Phillips and Halverson Design

In earlier posts about David Phillips’ art, I noted his collaboration with Halverson Design, but here I’ll let it shape my perspective with quotes from Cambridge Public Art resources about this park that opened in 1997 near Harvard Square.

Nancy Webb’s Bronze Insects and Plants Became Treasures in Cambridge

I’ve walked through Charles Park before, (on the way to or from CambridgeSide Galleria) without noticing most of nearly forty bronze representations of insects and plants Nancy Webb created almost three decades ago.  This week I came to find and focus on them, guided by the Cambridge Public Art Fact Sheet.

Gail Boyajian’s Mosaic on the Ground Looks Up to Birds, Myths, Flight, and Sky

While museums and art centers must be closed, I’ve opened my eyes to art outside their doors. Today I’ll focus on “Bird Mosaic” by Gail Boyajian in the memorial garden to the right of the gate to Maud Morgan Arts in my neighborhood. Planned sequel posts should show and tell more about the art center and the garden (Mary’s Garden).

Follow up on Elliott Kayser’s Pigs from their Year on the Greenway

The photos in this post come from January 1, 2020, the last time I visited Elliott Kayser’s eight ceramic pigs along the Rose Kennedy Greenway. They had kept their stations well for almost a year. Now that the Year of the Pig is almost over they are gone!

From a very informative Greenway blog post, I have learned that five of the pigs have moved on to the Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton. Chiefly the blog post clearly tells a story with great photos of ten steps involved in creating the pigs. If you wondered about the origins or future of these sculptures, about 250 pounds each, read that blog post.

Art Ramble 2019 Creates Connections in Concord Town Forest

Six weeks over and just two weeks left, I took the golden opportunity of a sunlit October morning to take the trail through Hapgood-Wright Town Forest around Fairyland Pond and enjoy fourteen temporary art installations connected by the theme, Witnessing Change. I hope to go again before it ends November 1 and to convince anyone who can to go as well. Each stop on Art Ramble 2019 offers an enlightening way to engage with some aspect of the forest.

George Sherwood’s Art and Tower Hill Botanic Garden: A Marvelous Match

Yet again I feel compelled to post without the revisiting, rereading, and rethinking I like to do before pushing the Publish button on this Wordpress site. George Sherwood’s kinetic sculpture exhibit Wind, Waves &  Light, Art in Motion, will end on October 14, 2019. Tower Hill Botanic Garden will continue and develop through the years ahead. I certainly want to see more of both, but first I must urge as many people as possible to plan to go before the sculptures leave.

Admire Animals by Artist Katharine Lane Weems in Boston: Dogs, Dolphins, Rhinos and More

The more I learn about sculpture by Katharine Lane Weems (1898 — 1989), the more I admire the art, the artist and the animals. An earlier post about two rhinos, Bess and Victoria, installed 1937 in Cambridge led me on to sites in Boston with work by this artist “famous for her realistic portrayals of animals.”  Her art combined scientific accuracy, meticulous renderings, and creative design to bring out the animals’ majesty and character. This post notes four places in Boston to be in the presence of her elegant animals. 

Indoor Activity Develops Outdoor Imagery for Mystic River Mural Panels

Thanks to David Fichter, one morning in August 2018 I got to visit the Mystic River Mural team at work in the Mystic Activity Center.  My photos from a few moments hint at the numerous hours of planning, researching, sketching, designing, projecting, shaping, painting and much much more by teens and adults involved in the project. Outdoor explorations along the river were key features of the project, but indoor studio time was key to creating the mural panels added to the ongoing mural outdoors along Mystic Avenue.