Category art history

Anne Whitney and Theo Alice Ruggles Kitson Dealt with Men on Pedestals

My first post about women artists represented on Public Art Walk Boston included art by both Anne Whitney and Theo Alice Ruggles Kitson on Commonwealth Avenue Mall. That was in March 2017. Now almost a year later, I will wrap up the promised project with their additional art. 

Lilli Ann Rosenberg Engaged People in Making and Enjoying Public Art

Lilli Ann Killen Rosenberg (1924–2011) initiated memorably collaborative community art projects wherever she went throughout her working life. From the Henry Street Settlement in New York City to numerous sites in the Boston area and then others in southern Oregon, she engaged children and adults in creating responsive public art. This post offers images from Boston sites I have visited and quotes or links that motivate me to visit many more.   

Sculptors of Statehouse Statues: Emma Stebbins, Sylvia Shaw Judson, and Isabel McIlvain

Of the seven Massachusetts State House statues listed on the Public Art Walk, three are by women, each from a different generation. This prompts me to present them in time order, with basic facts, key links, and selected quotes.

Storm King Art Center, Immense and Inviting

A blog called Art Outdoors cries out for posts about Storm King Art Center, a grand-scale sculpture park. Finally, I feel ready to respond, with a few starting notes, photos, and links. 

Beverly Pepper, A Presence of Her Own

Lately I’ve been motivated by my goal to post about every woman artist with work on the Boston Public Art Walk before Women’s History Month next year. Sudden Presence is Beverly Pepper’s Cor-ten steel sculpture on that walk. Suddenly I saw how much I had been missing.

Art Beneath Our Feet: Asaroton by Mags Harries

I chose to focus on Mags Harries now because her work is currently featured at the Boston Sculptors Gallery and also within an exhibit at the deCordova Museum through this summer. I’ll hope to have other opportunities to express my enthusiasm for what this inspiring artist has done and is still doing.

Four Fascinating Fountains in the Boston Public Garden

Four of the six fountain sculptures in the Boston Public Garden were created by women.The sculptures in these four fountains are smaller scale than the two by men. All four are bronze on granite bases in the center of bricked basins. The women artists depicted children or animals rather than grand heroic or symbolic beings.