Category bricks

Chalk Gives Voice on Days of Action in Cambridge and Somerville

This unplanned post shares fleeting street art from local actions on May 31, 2020. Rain may soon wash these chalk statements away, but there will be more to come.

David Judelson’s Brickworker and Ballplayer Keep on Documenting History

By  a ballfield  in North Cambridge ( Rindge Field) since 1983, two brick beings by David Judelson have faced each other supported by pertinent names, equipment, and stories. In recent years I had visited them with vague plans to post about them, though waiting for a way to focus. Then this spring when walks with face coverings became one of  the few recreational options, I discovered that Brickworker and Ballplayer had been outfitted in response to the pandemic.

Murals by Lisa Houck, Joshua Winer, and Ellery Eddy Reflect Cambridge History in Inman Square

These three murals within three blocks of each other build on local history and also have histories of their own, revealed as I lately took time to look at them and look online about them. A great resource was Lisa Houck’s documenting of the processes and people involved in restoring her mural on her blog and website. I hope now that the other murals noted here can get similar support to regain clarity, color, and impact. 

Nancy Milliken’s Earth Press Project: Witness, October Views

Ways to Witness Earth Press Project: WITNESS in the next few weeks: 1. Visit the real installation before November, 2. Visit Nancy Winship Milliken Studio website. 3. Visit NPS website for Minute Man National Historical Park. 4. Visit website for the Umbrella, Arts and Environment. Any or all of the above will give you a sense of the complicated steps, interactions, and connections within a seemingly simple structure.

IMAGINE (aka Sneha Shrestha) Shares Wondrous Ways to Brighten Brick, as in her Very Tall Mural in Cambridge

Here are images from my visits to IMAGINE’s recently completed mural in Cambridge and a few quotes from sources that describe her art. I hope that these will lead you to sites with fascinating scenes and stories that engage you in her process, purpose and perspective!

Eileen de Rosas’ Art Brings Life to Brick in Arlington

My January journey to this temporary art, up since mid-December, inspired me to track down information, stories, and colorful images that are best enjoyed on Eileen de Rosas’ website under Public Art.

James Weinberg’s Art Transforms a Brick Wall, a Bus Shelter, and a Book Idea

This fall brought opportunities to see three new works of art, each with different scale and surface, but in the same distinct compelling style of one artist, James Weinberg. Plants, animals, and sky appear in all three, adapted to the materials and dimensions assigned to their creation. A large brick wall, a framed glass structure, and the paper pages of a  picture book serve as stages for dynamic dramas. 

Clara Wainwright, Sydney Roberts Rockefeller, and other Artists Created Creature Pond

To keep up with the timing of my goal to post about women artists represented on Public Art Walk Boston, I’ll focus on the known facts now. This could lead to future posts with more fluent followup.

Lilli Ann Rosenberg Engaged People in Making and Enjoying Public Art

Lilli Ann Killen Rosenberg (1924–2011) initiated memorably collaborative community art projects wherever she went throughout her working life. From the Henry Street Settlement in New York City to numerous sites in the Boston area and then others in southern Oregon, she engaged children and adults in creating responsive public art. This post offers images from Boston sites I have visited and quotes or links that motivate me to visit many more.   

Watch for History and Humor by Kate Burke and Gregg LeFevre in “Boston Bricks,” Winthrop Lane

Yet again the goal to post about women artists with work on Boston Public Art Walk has led me to suddenly see what’s  been in plain sight so long, in this case since 1985. That year Kate K. Burke and Gregg LeFevre inlaid more than one hundred bronze relief tablets throughout the brick walkway of one historic lane in downtown Boston.