Category Massachusetts history

Sensational, Subtle Fog x FLO Includes Five Temporary Installations along the Emerald Necklace

This post identifies what you need to find and/or find out about the five distinct but related fog sculptures now in Boston until October 31, 2018. My photos from visits to three of those sculptures remind me of how much can change from moment to moment and how far my images are from revealing the moving drama of the art. 

Mystic River Mural Project is an Impressive Ongoing Story

For many years I had cast admiring glances at stretches of the Mystic River Mural while driving past the intriguing composite scenes. Always on the way to somewhere else, I never stopped or searched enough till recently to learn that the mural has been growing for more than twenty years!

Murals that Convey History: Local Examples

Walking to my nearby Porter Square and a bit beyond in Cambridge,  I visited murals that show elements of history in ways that suit this artform. You can learn and sense a lot about earlier centuries in Porter Square by walking the block that contains three related murals.  You can take in the impact and origins of a significant statesman’s life by standing in the presence of the Tip O’Neill mural in North Cambridge.

Uplifting Updates, Thanks to Boston Women’s Heritage Trail and Boston Art Commission

At the end of my self-assigned project of posting about women artists on Public Art Walk, I began to wonder how I could better share the fascinating discoveries that came from it.  After listing the artists and my posts on a blog page last month, I wished for some ways to convey what I had learned beyond my own small base of friends, colleagues, and family.  Now two organizations are doing what I wished for.

Anne Whitney and Theo Alice Ruggles Kitson Dealt with Men on Pedestals

My first post about women artists represented on Public Art Walk Boston included art by both Anne Whitney and Theo Alice Ruggles Kitson on Commonwealth Avenue Mall. That was in March 2017. Now almost a year later, I will wrap up the promised project with their additional art. 

Clara Wainwright, Sydney Roberts Rockefeller, and other Artists Created Creature Pond

To keep up with the timing of my goal to post about women artists represented on Public Art Walk Boston, I’ll focus on the known facts now. This could lead to future posts with more fluent followup.

Lilli Ann Rosenberg Engaged People in Making and Enjoying Public Art

Lilli Ann Killen Rosenberg (1924–2011) initiated memorably collaborative community art projects wherever she went throughout her working life. From the Henry Street Settlement in New York City to numerous sites in the Boston area and then others in southern Oregon, she engaged children and adults in creating responsive public art. This post offers images from Boston sites I have visited and quotes or links that motivate me to visit many more.