Category political issues

Colorful Characters Brighten Brine Tanks: Mural by Monique Aimee in Cambridge

Selected and funded by Percent-for-Art program in Cambridge, Monique Aimee proposed, planned, and painted her mural on all sides of the four tall brine tanks along the lot for Saint Peter’s Field. She began near the end of June and finished near the end of August. My photos here come from a few visits there throughout the summer. The links should take you to videos and exciting photos of the work in progress on Monique Aimee’s Instagram site: https://www.instagram.com/moniqueaimee/ The quotes here should give background that lets you visit in person or online.

Marvel at Moses Mosaic

The brilliant new mosaic mural above the Moses Youth Center entrance radiates reminders of its history and promise. While not much could happen inside through the summer 2020, the Moses Mosaic had been collaboratively created by community youth and artists before the pandemic began. So, in early July after weeks of labor-intensive installation, the Moses Mosaic was ready for public view.

See Poems in New Ways along the Bikeway in Arlington and Somerville

This week I enjoyed Walking Poetry in Arlington and  Poetry on the Path in Somerville. Both added to my awareness of when, how, and where a poem can move people. I should post swiftly and simply with quotes, links, and photos that let anyone who lives near these locations experience poems that may be elsewhere in a week or two.

John Tagiuri’s Art Can Open Doors in Surprising Ways

The two giant paintbrush “door pulls” created by John Tagiuri for Maud Morgan Visual Arts in 2009 when the center first opened now must wait for a post-lockdown reopening, whenever that will be. Meanwhile my attention to these and other artworks outside the center pulled me into John Tagiuri’s website, which is rich in samples of his other projects, all displaying unique combinations of strong concepts with playful twists. From those, I located the towering endless-column lamps over the basketball court in Sennott Park, at Broadway, Cambridge.

Chalk Gives Voice on Days of Action in Cambridge and Somerville

This unplanned post shares fleeting street art from local actions on May 31, 2020. Rain may soon wash these chalk statements away, but there will be more to come.

Marianna Pineda’s Sculptures Create Connections

While museums everywhere, including deCordova Sculpture Park, were closed for the past two months, I began to look more closely at the art that was still accessible in my neighborhood. Fortunately for me that includes the grounds of Harvard University and within those Radcliffe Yard. There among other areas with intriguing art is the Alexandra D. Korry Sculpture Garden around Marianna Pineda’s Oracle Portentous.

Birdwatching Merges with Watching Art on Somerville Community Path

Walking Somerville Community Path from Willow Ave toward Grove Street (near Davis Square), watch for hints of nesting in Christopher Frost’ s “Annex” and note the wide-spread wings of the newly landed Raven in “a Free Range Sculpture Garden.” 

David Judelson’s Brickworker and Ballplayer Keep on Documenting History

By  a ballfield  in North Cambridge ( Rindge Field) since 1983, two brick beings by David Judelson have faced each other supported by pertinent names, equipment, and stories. In recent years I had visited them with vague plans to post about them, though waiting for a way to focus. Then this spring when walks with face coverings became one of  the few recreational options, I discovered that Brickworker and Ballplayer had been outfitted in response to the pandemic.

Ink Block Underground Murals by Women Artists: Indie 184, Silvia López Chavez, Imagine876, Thy Doan

In honor of International Women’s Day, I will first focus on the four women artists who have created murals for Underground at Ink Block, an urban park that opened in Boston’s South End 2017. I have already enthusiastically posted about other murals by Silvia López Chavez and Imagine876 (Sneha Shrestha), but Thy Doan and Indie184 (Soraya Marquez) are new discoveries for me.

Rob “Problak” Gibbs Gave Momentum to his Mural, ‘Breathe Life 3’

Today I want to note this one of many murals by Rob “Problak” Gibbs and share some ways it adds to my awareness of what a mural can do. This one can actively demonstrate hand signs for its title when you view it through an app in your device. My post, so far, won’t directly reveal the actions but gives you links to see them or, better yet, go to the wall on Tremont Street at Camden Street, where you can enliven them yourself.