Category women artists

Gardens in Radcliffe Yard Contain Changing and Constant Art

While kept apart from most indoor art  throughout the spring of 2020, I became especially grateful for the outdoor art in Radcliffe Yard. I managed to post about one sculpture then, with intentions to mention more. Here now is a broader view that encompasses other highlights of Radcliffe Yard.

See Poems in New Ways along the Bikeway in Arlington and Somerville

This week I enjoyed Walking Poetry in Arlington and  Poetry on the Path in Somerville. Both added to my awareness of when, how, and where a poem can move people. I should post swiftly and simply with quotes, links, and photos that let anyone who lives near these locations experience poems that may be elsewhere in a week or two.

Playgrounds Thrive on Art by Mitch Ryerson and Gail Boyajian

As playgrounds have cautiously reopened, I can happily share photos of art by Mitch Ryerson and Gail Boyajian. This lifts my own sad restrictions on earlier posts about these artists and others with work outside Maud Morgan Arts. Now I can show and celebrate art that was meant to be where children play.

Marianna Pineda’s Sculptures Create Connections

While museums everywhere, including deCordova Sculpture Park, were closed for the past two months, I began to look more closely at the art that was still accessible in my neighborhood. Fortunately for me that includes the grounds of Harvard University and within those Radcliffe Yard. There among other areas with intriguing art is the Alexandra D. Korry Sculpture Garden around Marianna Pineda’s Oracle Portentous.

Nancy Webb’s Bronze Insects and Plants Became Treasures in Cambridge

I’ve walked through Charles Park before, (on the way to or from CambridgeSide Galleria) without noticing most of nearly forty bronze representations of insects and plants Nancy Webb created almost three decades ago.  This week I came to find and focus on them, guided by the Cambridge Public Art Fact Sheet.

Gail Boyajian’s Mosaic on the Ground Looks Up to Birds, Myths, Flight, and Sky

While museums and art centers must be closed, I’ve opened my eyes to art outside their doors. Today I’ll focus on “Bird Mosaic” by Gail Boyajian in the memorial garden to the right of the gate to Maud Morgan Arts in my neighborhood. Planned sequel posts should show and tell more about the art center and the garden (Mary’s Garden).

Ink Block Underground Murals by Women Artists: Indie 184, Silvia López Chavez, Imagine876, Thy Doan

In honor of International Women’s Day, I will first focus on the four women artists who have created murals for Underground at Ink Block, an urban park that opened in Boston’s South End 2017. I have already enthusiastically posted about other murals by Silvia López Chavez and Imagine876 (Sneha Shrestha), but Thy Doan and Indie184 (Soraya Marquez) are new discoveries for me.

Murals by Lisa Houck, Joshua Winer, and Ellery Eddy Reflect Cambridge History in Inman Square

These three murals within three blocks of each other build on local history and also have histories of their own, revealed as I lately took time to look at them and look online about them. A great resource was Lisa Houck’s documenting of the processes and people involved in restoring her mural on her blog and website. I hope now that the other murals noted here can get similar support to regain clarity, color, and impact. 

Birds Led to Absorbing Art on the Bikeway in Arlington

A sudden flurry of bird activity in my yard this past weekend got me out on the mild Monday, February 3, to revisit three artworks in easy walking distance from each other: Extraordinary Ordinary Birds, “Colony,” and “Penny the Swan.” All three added to my appreciations of birds and art.

Walks through Kip Tiernan Memorial on Dartmouth Street become Memorable

Since The Kip Tiernan Memorial near Old South Church in Copley Square was dedicated in early October 2018, I have walked through and also paused there several times. My photos in different seasons suggest how the sheltering structure subtly directs our flow and where we stop to read Kip Tiernan’s words. I feel that the design and details function as intended, to enhance memories and convey an overarching mission.