Category Women’s history

Uplifting Updates, Thanks to Boston Women’s Heritage Trail and Boston Art Commission

At the end of my self-assigned project of posting about women artists on Public Art Walk, I began to wonder how I could better share the fascinating discoveries that came from it.  After listing the artists and my posts on a blog page last month, I wished for some ways to convey what I had learned beyond my own small base of friends, colleagues, and family.  Now two organizations are doing what I wished for.

Anne Whitney and Theo Alice Ruggles Kitson Dealt with Men on Pedestals

My first post about women artists represented on Public Art Walk Boston included art by both Anne Whitney and Theo Alice Ruggles Kitson on Commonwealth Avenue Mall. That was in March 2017. Now almost a year later, I will wrap up the promised project with their additional art. 

Lilli Ann Rosenberg Engaged People in Making and Enjoying Public Art

Lilli Ann Killen Rosenberg (1924–2011) initiated memorably collaborative community art projects wherever she went throughout her working life. From the Henry Street Settlement in New York City to numerous sites in the Boston area and then others in southern Oregon, she engaged children and adults in creating responsive public art. This post offers images from Boston sites I have visited and quotes or links that motivate me to visit many more.   

Two Murals and Their Makers: “See Her” by Ann Lewis and “Patterned Behavior” by Silvia López Chavez

As new murals emerged in Boston this summer,  I tried to track two through different stages of development. Both reminded me that mural artists must envision on a grand scale while also dealing with daily details and constant complexities. Many minds, hands, and hearts helped both murals come into being. One source common to both was the force of the non-profit organization Now and There headed by Kate Gilbert featuring the Year of the Woman in public art. I have referenced and quoted from their wonderful website at several points in this post. 

Sculptors of Statehouse Statues: Emma Stebbins, Sylvia Shaw Judson, and Isabel McIlvain

Of the seven Massachusetts State House statues listed on the Public Art Walk, three are by women, each from a different generation. This prompts me to present them in time order, with basic facts, key links, and selected quotes.

Being in the Hands of Ursula von Rydingsvard

In connection with the exhibition Expanding Abstraction at the deCordova Museum (April 7—September 17, 2017) the museum’s Process Gallery highlights the art of Ursula von Rydingsvard and other women artists with work in deCordova Sculpture Park. I’m posting now to extend the connection to a recent monumental sculpture by Ursula von Rydingsvard at MIT.

Beverly Pepper, A Presence of Her Own

Lately I’ve been motivated by my goal to post about every woman artist with work on the Boston Public Art Walk before Women’s History Month next year. Sudden Presence is Beverly Pepper’s Cor-ten steel sculpture on that walk. Suddenly I saw how much I had been missing.